Music This Sunday

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Music This Sunday

SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2021: THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY

All services are being held online while we observe COVID-19 safety guidelines.

While we are away from each other, please enjoy these musical offerings lovingly created by Dr.  Paolo Bordignon, St. Bartholomew’s Choir, and musicians of the parish.

Watch and listen to our Choral and Organ Repertoire playlist.

Watch and listen to our Advent and Christmas music playlist.

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Marenzio: Tribus Miraculis

 Tribus miraculis

Luca Marenzio (1553/4-1599)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir

Dr. Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

 

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Praetorius: Lo, how a Rose e’er blooming
Melody publ. 1599
Harmony by Michael Praetorius (1571-1621)

Olivia Sue Greene, Wendy Gilles, Chris Carter, Jeff Morrissey
Members of St. Bartholomew's Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

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Gibbons: This is the Record of John

Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

From: John 1:19–23

Wendy Gilles, alto solo

St. Bartholomew's Choir

Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

 This verse anthem, one of the jewels from the Tudor repertoire, sets a text from the Gospel of John in the Geneva Bible. "John" (whose record is being told) refers to John the Baptist and the text concerns his prophecy foretelling the coming of Jesus. 

The piece is divided into three sections, each beginning with a verse for solo voice, followed by the full ensemble echoing words of the verse. The five-voice accompaniment may originally have been played by a consort of viols.

 

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Lo! he comes, with clouds descending

St. Bartholomew's Choir

Choristers

St. Bart's Singers

Dr. Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

Words: Charles Wesley (1707-1788)

Music: HELMSLEY, by Augustine Arne (1710-1778)

 

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Manz: E'en so Lord Jesus quickly come

Music: Paul Manz (1919-2009)

Words: from Revelation 22, adapted by Ruth Manz (1919-2008)

St. Bartholomew's Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Stanford: Te Deum, from Morning service in B-flat, Op. 10.
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)

St. Bartholomew's Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

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Séverac: Tantum ergo
Music: Déodat de Séverac (1872-1921)

Words: from "Pange lingua," Hymn for Corpus Christi
Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)

St. Bartholomew's Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

 

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Byrd: Vigilate

Music: William Byrd (1539/40-1623)

Words: Mark 13:35-37

St. Bartholomew's Choir

Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

 

 

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Bainton: And I saw a new heaven
Edgar Bainton (1880-1956)

St. Bartholomew's Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

Words: Revelation 21:1–4

 

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Stanford: Beati Quorum Via

Music: Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)

Words: Psalm 119:1

St. Bartholomew's Choir

Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

 

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 Bairstow: Psalm 23

Anglican chant by Edward Cuthbert Bairstow (1874-1946)

Olivia Sue Greene, Wendy Gilles, Chris Carter, Jeff Morrissey, Members of St. Bartholomew's Choir

Dr. Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

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Stanford: O for a closer walk with God

O for a closer walk with God
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)

Words: William Cowper (1731-1800)

St. Bartholomew's Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Ego sum panis vivus

Music: Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (c.1525-94)

Words: John 6:48-50

St. Bartholomew's Choir

Paolo Bordignon Organist and Choirmaster

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Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace (1853)

Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)

Words: Isaiah 26:3, Psalm 139:11, 1 John 1:5, Psalm 119:175

St. Bartholomew’s Choir

Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

 

 

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Praeludium in E Minor, "The Great" Nicolaus Bruhns (1665-1697)
Played on Aeolian-Skinner, Op. 275, at St. Bartholomew's Church.
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster
 
One of only 5 surviving organ works by the Danish-German virtuoso Nicolaus Bruhns, the Praeludium in E Minor (called "the great" to distinguish it from a shorter work) is widely considered one of the greatest works of the North German organ tradition. Bruhns was a prized pupil of Dieterich Buxtehude, as was J.S. Bach, who is said to have known and studied Bruhns's compositions.
Bruhns was also an accomplished violinist who, according to his contemporary Mattheson, "had the custom now and then of making a variation at the organ, playing the violin simultaneously with an appropriate pedal part, all by himself, in a most pleasing manner." The violinistic figurations in this piece at 4:35 suggest that unique practice.
This work is exemplary of the Stylus Phantasticus, an expression applied to virtuosic organ works of free form, extravagant modulation, arpeggiated passage-work, references to recitativo style and rhetorical gestures, fugal episodes, and an aesthetic that celebrates creativity, invention, and the unexpected. All of these elements feature prominently in this greatest work of Bruns, who lived only to age 31.
 

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Fight the Good Fight
from Five Hymns in Popular Style
John Gardner (1917-2011)

Words: John S. B. Monsell (1811-1875)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Come, Labor On
Hymn tune: Ora Labora
T. Tertius Noble (1867-1953)

Words: Jane Borthwick (1813-1897)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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I sat down under his shadow
Edward Cuthbert Bairstow (1874-1946)

Words: Song of Solomon 2:3-4.
St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

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Taize: Ubi caritas
Taizé chant by Jacques Berthier (1923-1994)

St. Bart's Singers
St. Bartholomew’s Choristers
St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Let thy merciful ears
Attributed to Thomas Mudd (c.1619-1667)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

Words: Collect for the Tenth Sunday after Trinity. 

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Ave Maris Stella
Edvard Grieg (1843-1907)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Tu Es Petrus

Robert Lucas de Pearsall (1795-1856)

St. Bartholomew's Choir

Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

Words: Matthew 16:18

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There's a wideness in God's mercy - St. Helena
Calvin Hampton (1938-1984)

Words: Frederick William Faber (1814-1863), alt.

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

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Dear Lord and Father of mankind

Words: John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892).
C. Hubert H. Parry (1848-1918)
Arr. H. A. Chambers to music from "Judith"

St. Bartholomew's Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Seigneur, je vous en prie
from “Quatre petites prières de Saint François d’Assise” (1948),
Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Tantum ergo, Op. 65, No. 2
Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

 

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Felix Mendelssohn
“Verleih uns Frieden”

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster 

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Words: "A Hymn for St. Cecilia," Ursula Vaughan Williams (1911-2007)
Music: Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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Aria: "Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt," SWV 380 (God so loved the world) from Geistliche Chormusik, 1648
by Heinrich Schütz (1585-1672)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

 

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Sing my soul his wondrous love, from Three Hymn Anthems (1955)
Ned Rorem (b. 1923)

St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

Help us, O Lord, from Four Motets
Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

Written in 1921 for a cappella mixed voices, Copland’s Four Motets remained unpublished until 1979. They were composed while he was studying with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. We know from Copland and Boulanger’s correspondence that the pieces were rehearsed by Melville Smith and first performed by the Paris-American-Gargenville Chorus in 1924. Boulanger herself conducted them shortly thereafter, and gave their first Paris performance in 1937. Writing to Copland about them in 1924, Boulanger tells the composer that “after daily rehearsals under Melville Smith the chorus has really done marvelously. Those motets sound in the voices in a stunning manner.”

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Jubilate Deo, Morning Service in B-flat, Op. 10
Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

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O Beata Trinitas
Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (c.1545-94)
St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster

The interplay of the five vocal lines, sometimes in a gentle cascade and at other times rising ecstatically toward the heavens, points to the otherworldly in Palestrina’s exquisite and refined musical style. For some, the frequent crossing of voices suggests the sign of the cross, the physical gesture of marking one’s self and actions in the name of the Trinity.

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Coelos ascendit hodie by Charles Villiers Stanford
St. Bartholomew’s Choir
Paolo Bordignon, Organist and Choirmaster
Headphones recommended for full antiphonal effect

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A virtual performance by St. Bartholomew’s Choir of “Surrexit Pastor Bonus” by Lassus, with an afterword by Organist & Choirmaster Paolo Bordignon about the work, the composer, and what virtue there may be in “virtual” performances.

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From our wonderful 9 am section leaders at Easter: This week, we would give anything to be able to sing together in person, so the St. Bart’s Singers Section Leaders decided to record one of the pieces we missed singing this year: Henry Purcell’s “Hear Our Prayer, O Lord.” Recording our parts individually is a solitary process, and it can’t replace the experience or quality of actual ensemble singing, but the opportunity to collaborate and to hear our voices joined together virtually is a balm, while we must be apart.

Enjoy this beautiful group offering from St. Bartholomew’s Choir, Dr. Paolo Bordignon, Choirmaster


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